Eona

“Everything Old Is New Again (EONA) is a modular table system manufactured from post consumer recycled materials. Its outstanding environmental credentials, combined with its sleek and timeless design, makes EONA ideal for conference and boardroom tables.

Uses 100% post consumer recycled aluminium for legs and leg support inserts, post consumer recycled steel for outer leg supports, rails and adjustable glides (steel material is generally produced with a minimum of 10% post consumer content, however our suppliers state that for EONA this figure is closer to 40%), and recyclable polypropylene.

Flexibility and diversity with legs that can be positioned at narrow or wide stances for small or large tables. Adjustments can be made both during and after installation, allowing the table frame to be reused for different future applications. EONA has been designed for 100% disassembly ready for recycling.

During the design process, Thinking Ergonomix commissioned a Life Cycle Assessment to ensure the product design met our high environmental expectations. We used this information to determine the amount of greenhouse gasses emitted from the manufacture of the table frame from cradle to cradle. In alignment with our sustainability practices, Thinking Ergonomix offsets the carbon dioxide through a certified carbon-offsetting program.”

Categories: Tables,

The world has changed, and while this presents a number of challenges, the solutions we engineer will generate new opportunities, not least in how we revolutionise the office, but in a way that not only saves time and money, it needs to deliver massive benefits for our health, wellbeing and productivity also.

What is hybrid working?

It’s a combination of old and new. It blends the traditional way of working, as we know it in the office, with modern technology. Ideal hybrid working is tailor-made to fit your personal situation as well as your business needs.  In essence, it allows staff to work from home or the office from day to day, or even within a workday. A company can give workers the freedom to choose when they’ll come into the office, or schedule a rotation, so there’s always a presence in the office while everyone is still getting the job done. This optimisation means better time management…

Saving time

If we go back to the days of our grandparents, they had to travel to work to and from work daily. Before the internet, this was the case for everyone, except for perhaps a few telemarketers. It kicked off with the industrial revolution where everything was about units of production (even people). But the industrial revolution, with all its excesses and exploitations, is long gone. With a choice of working in the office, or working from home, everyone can save time by not having to travel. A worker can be online and connected five minutes after they’ve woken up if they like.  Not only does this eliminate the end-of-day commute, which doesn’t help anybody’s mental health, but considers the benefits to health, safety and the environment when there are fewer vehicles on the road. At the same time, meetings can be organised and held in a matter of minutes, rather than waiting for everyone to gather together after setting space aside to host the meeting. Time is saved on an individual level, as well as for the company because workers can be set tasks and brought into meetings instantly. Having part of the workforce at home also means savings on space, infrastructure, utilities and rent.

 Cost efficiencies

 Companies can vastly reduce costs by reducing the resources required to house a full workforce day to day. According to research by Global Workplace Analytics, hybrid working can save a firm up to $17,000 New Zealand per employee, per year. Less office space is needed if workers come in on alternating days. A business could hold half the workforce they used to on a given day or even just have a small office for high-priority interactions. For a business, this means less spent on rent, maintenance, and even office amenities such as stationery, cleaning supplies, and coffee. On the worker’s side, it means costs saved on travel, parking and maintaining a closet of work clothes for each day of the week.

Peace of mind

By saving both time and money, hybrid working also creates a greater peace of mind. With more time for everyone, money saved, pressure is eased, and the quality of life at a company improves. A happier workforce is a more motivated and focused workforce. This means an overall improvement in performance, both in how things get done and those getting them done.

Conclusion

It’s then safe to say that hybrid working is revolutionising the office by making it more than a place and transforming it into a new, faster, more efficient, and cost-effective way in which to get business done. Setting up a hybrid office is a science on its own. Visit Shape Commercial and Interior workspace solutions for more information.